Stuc a' Chroin and Ben Vorich

Stuc a' Chroin and Ben Vorich

Saturday, 21 August 2010

Sea eagles

I've just heard that 19 Norwegian sea eagles have been released into the wild from a secret location in Fife. This is wonderful news and I wish them well in Scotland. This is the third phase of the reintroduction of these birds by East Scotland Sea Eagles, a partnership between RSPB Scotland, the Forestry Commission and Scottish Natural Heritage. The programme commenced in 1975 on Rum.

19 comments:

  1. That's brilliant news. I hope i see one, one day.

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  2. Sure is Alan. Never seen one either but, like you, I hope to one day.

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  3. It would be nice to see a steadily growing population eventually colonise some of the coastline of England and Wales. There are stretches of Northumberland and Cumbria, and parts of West Wales, which would provide decent habitat and food supply for them.

    Are farmers and landowners becoming more accepting of these reintroductions as time goes on?

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  4. Yes that would be most gratifying.

    As far as acceptance of reintroductions is concerned, I know that in 2008 crofters in the Gairloch area claimed that the 3 sea eagles introduced to that area were responsible for taking many of their lambs - up to 50% I think was the claim. The RSPB responded that this was nonsense and the birds were feeding on herring gulls, fulmars and the like.

    I know who I believe! Can't say I've heard much recently on this front, but I expect we will soon following this latest reintroduction.

    We have friends on Skye who, amongst other things, have a small croft and I can't say I've ever heard any negative comments from them regarding the sea eagles there.

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  5. Great, I love sea eagles, and wedge tails

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  6. Le Loup - Just had a look at some photographs of the wedge tail - beautiful.

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  7. Wonderful news about these beautiful birds.
    Thanks for the message on my blog.

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  8. Joanne - thanks for visiting. As you say, wonderful news.

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  9. Great news. Looking forward to seeing some of them.

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  10. I was really lucky in 1995 to watch a pair of sea-eagles playing just to the north of Oban. A passing farmer had spotted them and told me all about the re-introductions. He seemed fiercely proud that the birds were doing so well. They linked talons and spiralled down towards the ground, separating just before their imminent demise! They did this a few times and seemed to be having the time of their lives!
    I will never forget it.

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  11. Hello again Alan. What a wonderful experience to have had - you are indeed a lucky man!

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  12. I've just returned from my Scottish trip and read your post. Sounds like good news. I read recently about the Chain Walk on the Fife Coastal Path and have put it on my to do list. Do you know if there was a particular reason for selecting Fife as the release point for the Sea Eagles?

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  13. Sir High - they were gifted by Norway and reared in Fife in special aviaries until release.

    Sounded like you had a great time in Coigach etc. I spent Saturday glued to the TV watching Dave MacLeod and Tim Emmet on The Great Climb - the ascent of an outrageous line up Sron Uladal (OS spelling). Fantastic achievement. It's got me reaching for my climbing gear.

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  14. I don't know that coast very well but my immediate reaction was that it may not be ideal habitat for these birds, but I suppose they will soon find their preferred location.

    I knew the climbing epic was showing but omitted to get it recorded. Do you know if it is going to be repeated? What grade was the climb? What was the presentation like? As a climber one can usually find some reason to criticise which may not be observed by the average viewer.

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  15. It was superb in every way - and I say that as a climber. Not sure whether it's going to be repeated but it's coming on DVD. The first pitch was E7, the second was E9, third and fourth looked E6 or E7 and the final was E5 (I won't spoil the last pitch for you by saying any more!) It was continuously overhanging (150ft in 600ft) and it's the fact that it is just so sustained that made it remarkable. Even to imagine a free route through such ground is an achievement! It rained all day but the climbers stayed completely dry until pitch 5. The key thing was that it was done in the best tradition of Scottish/British traditional climbing with no pre-placed protection. It is reckoned to be (probably)the hardest traditional climb anywhere - and Dave MacLeod did it with 5 stitches in his foot following and accident a few days earlier while on the cliff. The presenters were also superb - Mark Garthwaite, Duncan McCallum, Stephen Venables. Dougie Vipond presented the programme well, Cameron McNeish did a bit too and there were interesting 'interludes' covering Harris, its culture etc. I think it's still available on iplayer.

    In case the climb was called off because of bad weather, like the previous planned 'Great Climb', MacLeod and Emmet climbed 5 new routes on 5 islands in 5 days and these were recorded -they weren't shown but will be later and are also coming on DVD sometime.

    You'd have to be very determined to find fault with this programme Conrad.

    As for the sea eagles I understand that there is already a population somewhere on the east coast so the habitat must be OK.

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  16. Sir Hugh - the Great Climb route, named 'The Usual Suspects' has been graded E9 7a.

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  17. A visiting friend was impressed with the heading photo on your blog. would you mind telling me where it is - thanks.

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  18. Sir Hugh - It's the view from Beinn a'Chaisgein Mor to A'Mhaighdean, Ruadh Stac Mor etc taken in May last year.

    Hope you enjoyed you're recent trip north. We've just got back from a week in Glen Coe. I really must get back to this blog!

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