Stuc a' Chroin and Ben Vorich

Stuc a' Chroin and Ben Vorich

Saturday, 21 January 2017

Wednesday 18 January - Corb Law and Corb Glen to above Coul

Corb. 1428 'Crob'. Derivation for this form 'compare Gaelic 'Crob', later 'Crobh', a hand, a claw, possibly referring here to some perceived shape in the terrain. For instance the contours on the north side of Corb Law on OS maps trace the shape of a hand with outstretched thumb and clenched fingers (Angus Watson, The Ochils, Placenames, History, Tradition).

He's correct of course, but we had no knowledge of this when setting out for Corb Glen and Law. Watson does point out that the hand shape is not easy to see on the ground and the reference may be a 'tantalising coincidence'. We need to go back.

Can you see the hand?


A locked gate, the top festooned with barbed wire, gave the distinct impression that walkers were not welcome. We squeezed through a gap with me taking extra care not to catch my brand new ME Lhotse jacket and headed into the cold, raw, wind. A short distance up the track and yet another barbed gate appeared but at least this one opened. We had been in the Glen many years ago dropping off John's Hill but had never approached from the delightful B934 to Dunning although we've used it to access other hills in the area.

Barbed gate number two and Corb Law


The steepish slopes of Corb Law and John's Hill (left) form Corb Glen

Around this point we left the track for Corb Hill, an easy ascent over the usual tussocky Ochils ground but again barbed wire covered the top of an old wooden fence which we had to cross. It was cold and the strong wind battered us as we followed the fence northwards. We're not fans of walks where at some arbitrary point we turn round and retrace our steps, but today that's exactly what happened. Black Hill of Kippen, a vague objective initially, seemed hardly worth a visit so once the view north opened up, we hurried back to Corb Law and downwards for some lunch.

Our day out having been thus shortened, Lynne suggested we wander through the Glen to the point above Coulshill Farm where the RoW from Glendevon to Auchterarder descends to meet our route.

The new sign was damaged. Note the 'avoiding Coulshill Farm'.



I suspect this was damaged on purpose. Perhaps more evidence of hostility to walkers. Note the ghastly Greenknowes Windfarm

We went no further and enjoyed a leisurely stroll back to the car. Somewhere along the way, I lost my sit mat.

Not a good day for photos but click to enlarge if you wish.

A circuit would have given a slightly longer day

10 comments:

  1. Hi Gibson, I was never a fan of out and back walks, and still prefer a circular route, but Jo has persuaded me to soften a bit on the subject by pointing out that the views (and often the light) are different on the return journey. She's right, of course; I might even have admitted that out loud in a moment of weakness!

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  2. Yes Dave, you've got to be careful about admitting things out loud but just between you and me, Jo makes a good point. I said out loud that Lynne should have the women's version of my new jacket and hey presto, it arrives Monday...

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  3. The claw is easier to spot on the map than it is on the satellite image. Plenty of tops there to make a grand days walking.

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    1. Hi Alan. We've done most, if not all, of the tops and circuits around here many years ago usually from the Glendevon side. The wind farm has ruined the walk out to Steele's Knowe over Ben Thrush and the lack of parking at the former YH site mentioned in an earlier post means new approaches will need to be found, but we're looking forward to doing these little hills again from completely different starting points. It's an ill wind etc.

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  4. The Auchterarder sign brought back memories. When I was finishing off the Munros, my friend Pete accompanied me doing about 30 on several visits. On the drive north we discovered Café Kisa in Auchterarder and went back there each time. There was a very pleasant waitress who Pete flirted with. On the first visit I knew there was something well known about the area (turned out to be its proximity to Gleneagles), but when I asked the waitress, "what is Auchterarder well known for?" she told me, but Pete chipped in with, "... and your wonderful smile!"

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    1. Sir Hugh - we know Cafe Kisa well and it still provides lovely coffee and food - and smiling waitressses. Apart from the famous Gleneagles Hotel and golf courses Auchterarder became more widly known in 2005 when the G8 summit was held at the Hotel. It was a strange experience to see the huge police presence in the town - forces from all over the UK - when normally you never see any!

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  5. Will be interested to hear how the new jackets go

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    1. Hi Anonymous

      I used mine every day last week - 6 days out of 7 and so far it's everything I expect from ME, although there's been no rain. I've never had an issue with any ME gear so I'm not expecting any problems with this jacket.

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  6. Hi, I have received a recomendation from Dave who has the blog "The Oss Road" to add your blog to my blogroll. It looks like I have quite a bit of reading to do. If you get the time I have a blog at www.awalkonthemildside.co.uk I am always pleased if a return link appears, but of course, only if you feel my site worthy. TTFN

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  7. Welcome Andrew. Very kind of Dave to recommend this blog. I hope you are not disappointed because for various reasons I have not been keeping things up to date. I shall add your blog to my roll and look forward to reading about your adventures.

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