Stuc a' Chroin and Ben Vorich

Stuc a' Chroin and Ben Vorich

Sunday, 31 May 2015

Saturday 30 May - Beinn nan Carn (Marilyn) and a visit to the cleared village of Boreraig






It was cloudy (as usual) as we set off from our parking spot but there was hope that the sun would at last make more than a fleeting appearance.


The path leads to Boreraig but our first objective was the Marilyn lying above Loch Lonachan. We made quick progress spurned on by the cold and a late-ish start. At a stile a notice informed us that we were entering Beinn nan Carn Woodland established between January and May 2000 under the Government Assisted Woodland Grant Scheme. The gross area of the woodland is 275 hectares and has been designed to mimic native woodland distribution patterns. The 240,000 trees which have been planted - birch, rowan, alder, willow, ash, oak, hazel, aspen and holly - were grown from seed gathered from existing native woodlands on Skye.

Heartening to read, and the young trees were in evidence. Meanwhile the community at Ose on north Skye has welcomed approval for a wind farm in Glen Ullinish with 14 turbines. Guess where I won't be visiting again.

A surprisingly large cairn marked the 301m summit of Beinn nan Carn which was easily reached from the track, although the lower terrain provided ample opportunity to plunge feet into deep boggy holes. This we managed to avoid - until on the way down.

Once back on the track we continued southwards in the sun. It is truly a delightful walk by the Allt na Pairte. Loch Eishort sparkled, on its shores the lush fields and sad ruins of Boreraig. Here in the mid-19th century Lord Macdonald evicted the people in mid-winter - men, women and children. The are many ruins here
and I found it easy to imagine the plight of those who had their homes destroyed, left to the mercy of the elements. I felt both angry and sad.

Reluctantly we turned away from this beautiful place and made our way back to Strath Suardal. Bla Bheinn was looking magnificent; Ladhar Bheinn was topped with fresh snow. There really is no where like Skye on such a day.


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6 comments:

  1. Sheila and I walked up onto Ben Scudaig from Ose. Its a lovely place, great views. We talked at the time about imagining when all the hill forts and Brocks and Duns were being used and how wonderful the scene must have been. I'm sure that there is much more archeology to be found in this area and a wind farm development being given permission to be constructed here is beyond comprehension.
    We are glad you had a good day and can imagine how awful it would be to come back and see the destruction in this landscape.

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    1. Hi Alan. I've not done Ben Scudaig so better hurry. It's a tragedy but I wasn't surprised when it was approved. When it was first mentioned I put to a local guy helping out at a friend's campsite that it would be a great shame if the area was ruined further. He replied that there was 'nothing there' so didn't see what all the fuss is about. That was a common opinion in the area. The crafters wanted a wind farm.

      I imagine the turbines will dominate the view across beautiful Loch Bracadale which will be heartbreaking. Hope your weather is better than ours today!

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  2. People who work the land have a different view of it to hill walkers. We have the same problem/mentality where we live. I can understand the people in Ose wanting to benefit if thats what you can call it. But it will keep people away.
    The weather yesterday was pretty bad but we did a wall up onto the tops north of Mellon Charles.

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    1. I totally agree Alan, they do have a different view but I guess most in the central belt of Scotland wouldn't think there was anything worth protecting either - and obviously Highland Council didn't think so, but nothing new there. All the best. Weather looking up I think.

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  3. You're probably right about the views of those living in the central belt, Gibson, and it's the same elsewhere. Propose putting turbines on the Salisbury Craigs, though - totally logical when you consider Edinburgh's consumption - and they would soon become an unacceptable blight. It would be exactly the same if The Chilterns, The Cotswolds, or The Malverns were earmarked. Give us the electricity, keep the monstrosities elsewhere seems to be the mindset.

    Footnote: I'm obviously not advocating sticking turbines in any of the places I've mentioned above.

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    1. Hi Dave. And you could add the Pentlands to your list, nothing like as fine a range as the Ochils, but untouchable. I'm not advocating putting turbines on the Pentlands any more than you are in the Cotswolds etc but it would be interesting to hear the views of the residents of Edinburgh if such a proposal were to be made. I bet I'd hear the screams across the Forth.

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